How To Enable TPM 2.0 In BIOS Asus

The term TPM 2.0 is not new, but with the announcement of a revised version of windows 11 with a new design, everyone has gotten confused due to the requirement of TPM 2.0. Do you know what TPM 2.0 is and why you need one? Let’s discuss in detail what you need to get TPM 2.0 and how to enable TPM 2.0 in BIOS Asus. So, bear with me.

How To Enable TPM 2.0 In BIOS Asus?

Start your PC; go to BIOS by pressing F2/Del, then Advanced, and there enable the TPM 2.0 and then save settings by clicking on F10 and restart your PC. 

Though the process is easy but difficult and complicated for those, who don’t know about the term or the system specification requirements for installing and enabling it or its importance, so if you are from an unfamiliar group, then this post is worth reading. Continue it, 

What Is TPM 2.0? 

Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0 isn’t software but a hardware component that provides a secure environment for storing and managing cryptographic keys, passwords, and other sensitive data. It is now necessary to be enabled in windows 11 for its installation and running. If a system doesn’t support TPM 2.0, nothing will help out except purchasing a new CPU that is compatible with windows 11 and TPM 2.0.

Why Is TPM 2.0 Important?

Though it wasn’t necessary initially now for windows 11, TPM 2.0 is essential to present and enable. It can be used to enhance the security of a system in several ways:

  1. Secure boot: TPM 2.0 verifies the boot process’s integrity and prevents the system from booting from unauthorized or compromised software.
  2. Full-disk encryption: TPM 2.0 stores the encryption keys for full-disk encryption, providing an additional layer of protection against unauthorized access to data stored on the disk.
  3. Secure storage: TPM 2.0 provides a secure storage location for sensitive data, such as passwords and cryptographic keys, which can be used to authenticate the user or protect data from unauthorized access.
  4. Two-factor authentication: TPM 2.0 can be used in conjunction with other authentication methods, such as a password or biometric data, to provide an additional layer of security.
  5. Virtual private network (VPN) authentication: TPM 2.0 can be used to securely store the keys used to establish a VPN connection, providing an additional layer of security for remote access to a network.

Overall, TPM 2.0 can help improve the security of a system by providing a secure environment for storing and managing sensitive data, protecting against unauthorized access, and enabling the use of additional authentication methods.

Is It Necessary For Windows 11?

Previously windows 11 didn’t ask for an installed and enabled version of TPM 2.0, but after the new version, now no system can run windows 11 if TPM 2.0 is not available. So, if you want to check whether your system has it, the following paragraphs will help you with this. 

Can I Add TPM 2.0 To My PC Myself?

You can potentially add a TPM 2.0 chip to your motherboard if you built your own PC and the motherboard is compatible with it.

Additionally, if you have the necessary technical knowledge and experience, you may feel comfortable adding a TPM 2.0 chip to your motherboard, even if it involves taking on some risk. And this can help improve the security of your system by providing an additional layer of protection against external threats. However, it is essential to carefully consider the potential risks and drawbacks before making any changes to your system’s hardware or software settings.

Is Your Asus PC Compatible With Windows 11?

The first thing is to check whether your system supports windows 11, and for that, you need some information before checking the specs. 

  • Does your system support Windows 10?
  • Does your PC already use the 2004 or later version of Windows 10?

If this is the case, let yourself be happy, as you can update windows 11 by just going to ‘Settings’ and then ‘Update and Security.’

The next thing is to check the specs; if your system doesn’t support the minimum requirements, it will cause hindrance in installing and running windows 11. So for this purpose, you have to purchase a new CPU that meets the below-mentioned requirements for Windows 11. 

Source: Microsoft

How To Check If Your System Has Or Supports TPM 2.0?

There are three ways of checking if your PC is compatible with windows 11 or TPM 2.0. Let’s discuss them.

PC Health Check tool is a helping tool by Microsoft which helps the user to find out if their system has all the specs needed to install and upgrade to windows 11. So, in order to check the specs, follow the steps below. 

  • You must first download the PC health check, for which you have to go to the site and download the PC health check app. 
  • Once downloaded the zip file, unzip it and click on setup to install it. 
  • Accept the license’s conditions, then start the installation.
  • Once installation is completed, open the app for checking. 
  • Click on check now.
  • If the box which appears on your screen shows that the PC can run windows 11, it’s good, which means your system is compatible and meets the minimum requirements.  
  • If it shows that the requirements are not fulfilled, and you need to enable TPM 2.0, read the following heading to understand the enabling process. 

Another way to check the required specs is by pressing the Windows key + R. You will see a box with the name ‘Run,’ type “TPM.MSC” in the box in front of ‘open.’

After clicking ok, Trusted Platform Module (TPM) Management screen will come n the screen if the feature TPM 2.0 has already been enabled. But if a box appears with the message that the TPM has not been found, it means you have to check whether it is in your system and enabled or not. 

Moreover, you can also check it in the BIOS. For that, open the BIOS, go to the Advanced option and find out the TPM. If it is not there, enable it by using the following heading. 

How To Enable TPM 2.0 In BIOS Asus?

If you have checked that your Asus system supports Windows 11 and is compatible with it and TPM 2.0, but still your system shows that “TPM can’t be found, “you have to enable it. Let’s discuss how you can enable TPM 2.0 in both AMD and Intel processors one by one. 

Keep in mind that these instructions are only for Asus motherboards. And Asus motherboards are compatible with the TPM 2.0 version; you just need to enable it. If you want to check how to enable TPM 2.0 in BIOS MSI, click here.

Enable TPM 2.0 in AMD processors. 

  • Firstly, restart your Asus system.
  • At the startup point, press F2/Del key repeatedly to go to the BIOS point.
  • Click on the Advanced tab; if you can’t see it, press the F7 key. Thus, it will switch to Advanced mode.
  • You will see ‘AMD fTPM Configuration,’ under this option, you will get ‘AMD fTPM switch.’ This option allows you to enable or disable TPM 2.0 in AMD processors. 
  • Once you enable it, then press the F10 key; thus, the system saves changes and resets. Click on yes when you see a prompt with such an option appear on your screen. 

Enable TPM 2.0 in Intel processors

  • Firstly, restart your Asus system.
  • At the startup point, press F2/Del key repeatedly to go to the bios point.
  • Click on the Advanced tab; if you can’t see it, press the F7 key. Thus, it will switch to Advanced mode.
  • You will see ‘PCH-FW configuration,’ under this option, you will get ‘AMD fTPM switch.’ 
  • To configure the PCH-FW, click on “PCH-FW configuration” and select “Firmware TPM.” If the option “PTT” is available after clicking on “PCH-FW configuration,” select it and enable it.” This option allows you to enable or disable TPM 2.0 in Intel processors.
  • After enabling it, press the ‘F10 key’ to save the changes and restart the system. When a prompt appears on your screen with the option to confirm, click “Yes.”

Conclusion 

How to enable TPM 2.0 in bios Asus? I hope all your queries related to it are solved now. So, check if your system is compatible with Windows 11 and TPM 2.0. After that, enable it to protect your system further from unauthorized access and hackers.

Hi, yasir here. I have always been interested in Technology and loved to take them apart and put them back together. I studied computer hardware engineering at MIT and now work as a computer engineer. I am the chief editor at Coded Couture. My goal is to help people make informed decisions about the products they buy.

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